Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 33
<div><span style="font-size: small;">The G1 series from GIGABYTE has seen a recent expansion of late &ndash; from the previous socket to new chipset releases, GIGABYTE is now attempting to provide a model at almost every reasonable price point in the market. &nbsp;The purpose of this is to provide a gaming platform for any budget, using gaming features such as OP-AMP, USB-DAC.UP and Gain Boost. &nbsp;At the mid point of the spectrum is the G1.Sniper Z87, which we are reviewing today.</span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size: small;">As we have discussed in previous publications on AnandTech, attempting to decipher the benefit of an audio solution can be a difficult task. &nbsp;On a recent post where we asked for our reader input, there were substantial numbers in all three categories &ndash; (i) Onboard audio is good enough, no need to test it; (ii) Keep going with similar tests, it is good to see some data; and (iii) These tests show almost nothing about the audio that audiophiles care about. &nbsp;So when GIGABYTE is supplying us with their gaming motherboard that has a frontal focus on audio, trying to quantify the audio gains as such can be difficult. &nbsp;Luckily, the focal points of GIGABYTE&rsquo;s audio engineering additions are actually tangible that we can play with, rather than merely &lsquo;part of the design&rsquo;.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: small;"><br type="_moz" /> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://anandtech.com/show/7762/gigabyte-g1sniper-z87-review" target="_blank">Read more...</a></span></div>

Gigabyte GA-Z87X-OC motherboard is targeted for open testbeds and overclocking experiments. That is why it has a bunch of special and very interesting distinctive features. But this mainboard is not optimal for ordinary desktops and in this review we tell you why.

Read more...

<p><span style="font-size: small;">Breaking into the X79 game at this late stage is a rough business. The major action was at the Sandy Bridge-E launch, and the Ivy Bridge-E release was a minor bump in comparison. Due to the lack of a new chipset, only a few motherboard vendors put a new product onto the market for the IVB-E launch. One of them was MSI, with the slightly non-conventional X79A-GD45 Plus, which we are reviewing today.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.anandtech.com/show/7752/msi-x79agd45-plus-review-building-up" target="_blank">Read more...</a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size: small;">The TUF range from ASUS is a different sort of blip on the motherboard radar &ndash; they come with a five year warranty. ASUS will mention that the hardware is built around the idea of stability, using upgraded components in order to do so. I have rarely had the chance to look at the TUF range, but today we look at ASUS&rsquo; first micro-ATX TUF motherboard, the Z87 Gryphon.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.anandtech.com/show/7720/asus-tuf-z87-gryphon-review" target="_blank">Read more...</a></span></p>
<div><span style="font-size: small;">Alongside their line of channel and ROG motherboards, ASUS also has business (B/Q chipset) and Workstation (WS) lines for professional markets. The goal of these products is compatibility and stability &ndash; the desire to be a rock solid product in the face of any computational conundrum. Today we are reviewing hopefully the first of many ASUS WS motherboards &ndash; the P9X79-E WS, for the socket 2011 / performance Xeon market. This is an upgrade over the P9X79 WS, featuring a PLX chip giving seven full length PCIe slots.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: small;"><br /> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size: small;">The goal of the P9X79-E WS is to be able to tackle anything a user wants to use in it: in order to ensure this, ASUS try to validate as many RAID cards, 10 GbE cards, FPGA and PCIe devices as possible. The goal of the P9X79-E WS is to be the final frontier in single socket performance, suggesting that a 12 core Xeon E5-2697W and several of the latest Xeon Phi cards is just a walk in the park, as well as any consumer level CPU. If a user needs to run seven RAID cards should not be a problem here.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: small;"><br /> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size: small;">Several of the main features of workstation motherboards are hard to test from a review point of view. &nbsp;Compatibility is wholly taken from the QVL list: either a device works or it does not &ndash; if I find a device that does not and tell ASUS, chances are it will probably be working in the next BIOS update. Stability and longevity is hard to test as well &ndash; these motherboards are built to withstand several years at full throttle in high ambient temperatures, so if I tested it like that and it fails or works, then it might be up to the sample and I would have to take a statistical look at MTBF (mean time between failures) &ndash; a test not within my remit and could take a while to perform! Feature comparisons and performance are thus vital to our testing &ndash; aesthetics for gaming motherboard evaluations are not required here. It needs to work, ideally out of the box, and work well.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: small;"><br type="_moz" /> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.anandtech.com/show/7613/asus-p9x79e-ws-review" target="_blank">Read more...</a></span></div>
<p><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><span style="font-family: Arimo, sans-serif; line-height: 21px; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: 1px; background-color: rgb(246, 246, 246);">When Ivy Bridge-E arrived, there was discontent at the lack of a new chipset.&nbsp; Users who wanted to migrate to the high performance end of the spectrum received a relatively small bump in performance over Sandy Bridge-E and Haswell on the mainstream was offering better IPC. To compound all this, the X79 chipset looks dated, with no native USB 3.0 and only two SATA 6 Gbps. ASUS have tried to address this balance somewhat by releasing an upgrade to the bestselling X79 motherboard: the Rampage IV Black Edition is an evolution of the Rampage IV Extreme, incorporating as many aspects of the Maximus Z87 series as possible into an antiquated chipset.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.anandtech.com/show/7612/asus-rivbe" target="_blank">Read more...</a></span></p>

The motherboard is based on Intel Z87 but powered with a lot of additional controllers. Some features of Gigabyte G1.Sniper 5 are typical for high-end platforms and some are unique. The board has many advantages and a very few disadvantages.

Read more...

Asus Z87-Deluxe is good and balanced model for powerful LGA 1150 system. It has additional SATA 6 Gb/s and USB 3.0 controllers, Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac and Bluetooth support dual Gigabit Ethernet, two CPU fan headers and two POST-codes indicators. However we had seen some problems with it.

Read more...

This is a very well-made mainboard model with classic feature set. The functionality includes: additional USB 3.0 and SATA 6 Gbps ports, IEEE 1394 (FireWire) and Thunderbolt ports, two network adapters, wireless technologies, AMD CrossFire and Nvidia SLI, as well as a special connector for mSATA and mini-PCIe cards.

Read more...

<p><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: Arimo, sans-serif; line-height: 21px; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: 1px; background-color: rgb(246, 246, 246);">In the office I am currently running through a series of smaller sized motherboards &ndash; both micro-ATX and mini-ITX.&nbsp; Due to the size, there is plenty of scope to push towards something niche, something that works, or something that slips comically on a banana by missing the point entirely.&nbsp; Today we have in the ASRock Z87E-ITX, </span><strike style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arimo, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 21px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: 1px; background-color: rgb(246, 246, 246);">$150</strike><span style="font-family: Arimo, sans-serif; line-height: 21px; -webkit-text-stroke-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: 1px; background-color: rgb(246, 246, 246);">&nbsp;$140 motherboard that flew under my radar until it landed on my test bed.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.anandtech.com/show/7484/asrock-z87eitx-review" target="_blank">Read more...</a></span></p>
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 33